August 23, 24 & 25, 2019 ~ Presented by the Friends of the Porkies

2019 Artists


THE WAR AND TREATY (Headliner) - As The War and Treaty, Michael and Tanya Trotter serve up healing and pain robbing with freewheeling joy on their new full-length album, Healing Tide. Funky bass lines, keys, lap steel, acoustic strings, and stripped-down percussion create a swampy Southern soul bed for the couple’s transcendent vocals. A tour-de-force produced by Buddy Miller, the collection swaggers with confidence only gained by artists who are wholly, proudly, themselves.

Michael is a wounded warrior who found his voice while serving in Iraq, when he was pulled from the frontlines to write songs for the fallen. Tanya is a lifelong artist, drawn to singing’s power to take another’s pain away. “You have to have a deep place of love within yourself to be vulnerable,” Tanya says. “With The War and Treaty, we allow people to see two people that are not perfect. We get on stage. We sweat. We’re overweight. We yell. We get ugly, we scream! My hair comes loose. We’re vulnerable––naked––in front of people, and it’s a chain reaction. It allows them to be vulnerable, too.”

The War and Treaty’s music and stories bring tears and goosebumps, but ultimately, more is at work. “I want people to feel like we care,” Michael says. “When you think about artists, you don’t think about that.” He pauses and grins broadly. “But that’s the way I want the world to feel about The War and Treaty.”


DUSTBOWL REVIVAL (Headliner) - Over the past few years, The Dustbowl Revival has been making a name for itself with a vibrant mix of vintage Americana sounds. Critics have proclaimed that this eclectic eight-piece “would have sounded utterly at home within the hallowed confines of Preservation Hall in New Orleans' French Quarter” (Los Angeles Times) and their “upbeat, old-school, All-American sonic safaris exemplify everything shows should be: hot, spontaneous, engaging and, best of all, a pleasure to hear” (L.A. Weekly). Rob Sheffield, in Rolling Stone, hailed them as a great band “whose Americana swing was so fun I went back to see them again the next day.”

In 2008, Zach Lupetin and The Dustbowl Revival released their debut album, The Atomic Mushroom Cloud of Love. They followed up in 2010 with You Can’t Go Back to the Garden of Eden, which included "Dan's Jam,” a song that won the Independent Music Awards’ “Americana Song of the Year.” The next year, the band, now known just asThe Dustbowl Revival, put out Holy Ghost EP and their 2013 Carry Me Home CD featured more than 25 Dustbowl Revival-ists. That was also the year the L.A. Weekly crowned them the city’s “Best Live Band.”

The Dustbowl Revival found a bigger audience when Signature Sounds released With a Lampshade On in 2015. The video for “Never Had To Go,” starring band fan Dick Van Dyke, became an Internet sensation. The group went on to open for bands ranging from Lake Street Dive to the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, while also appearing at such festivals as Delfest, Floydfest, Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, and more recently, Norway’s Bergenfest and Tonderfest in Denmark.


CARY MORIN - Described as “one of the best acoustic pickers on the scene today,” Cary Morin brings together the great musical traditions of America and beyond like no other. With deft fingerstyle guitar and vocals that alternately convey melodic elation and gritty world-weariness, Morin crafts an inimitable style often characterized as acoustic Native Americana with qualities of blues, bluegrass, jazz, jam, reggae, and dance.

“Cary Morin is a unique and brilliant guitar player, songwriter and singer”,  says renowned folk musician David Bromberg.

Morin’s sixth release, When I Rise, follows close on the heels of an international tour that spanned the U.S. and reached as far as Italy, France, and Germany.

Crow tribal member and son of an air force officer, Morin was born in Billings, Montana. He spent the bulk of his youth in Great Falls, where he cut his teeth picking guitar standards at neighborhood get-togethers, before relocating to Northern Colorado. There, his musical career hit the ground running with The Atoll, a band he founded in 1989 and that toured nationally, gaining a devoted following. Later, he achieved international acclaim with The Pura Fé Trio, for whom the single “Ole Midlife Crisis,” which Morin wrote and performed with Pura Fé, placed at number 17 on France’s iTunes
blues chart. With The Atoll and The Pura Fé Trio, and as a solo artist, Morin has played celebrated venues across the globe, including Paris Jazz Festival, Winter Park Jazz Festival, Folk Alliance International, River People Festival, Shakori Hill Festival, the 2010 Vancouver Olympics, and most recently Rochefort En Accords festival in France and The Copenhagen Blues Festival. Cary has won numerous awards for his work, particularly for his 2017 release, Cradle to the Grave, which has received the 2018 Independent Music Awards for Best Blues CD, a 2018 International Songwriting Competition Honorable Mention, a 2018 Native Arts and Cultures Fellowship, a 2017 First Peoples Fund Artist in Business Leadership Fellowship, and the 2017 Indigenous Music Awards for Best Blues CD.


IVY FORD BAND - Ivy Ford, The Chicago Blues Kitten, is a red lipstick wearing guitar slinging entertainer you’ll never forget. She kick started her career opening for the living blues legend Buddy Guy in 2015 and since then has been a staple there at his club  is becoming “the fresh face” of blues and roots music. Ivy Ford released her first original album, “Time to Shine,” in 2018 and it was so well received it was nominated for soul blues album of the year for the 2018 Blues Blast Music Awards; she herself nominated for the “Sean Costello, Rising Star award.” Among their various travels and performances, The Ivy Ford Band took to the top 8 bands in the 2019 International Blues Challenge in Memphis, TN where they performed her newest original work, “Harvesting My Roots.” Releasing the studio recording  in March 2019, Ivy Ford’s single “Harvesting My Roots,” is one of her tools to accomplish the ongoing mission of hopefully bridging the generation gap between Blues/Roots/Americana music and younger generations like herself and those to come; With a delta blues inspired arrangement that has a urban and hip-hop backbone she thinks it is sure to do the trick.

Ivy Ford, The Chicago Blues Kitten, plans on being an encouraging example and icon not just for the blues but to female entertainers and more importantly the generations of audience both young and “seasoned.”


CHARLIE PARR - An easily confused and very shy individual, Charlie Parr has been traveling around singing his songs ever since leaving Austin Minnesota in the 1980's in search of Spider John Koerner, whom he found about 100 miles north at the Viking Bar one Sunday night. The experience changed his life, made him more or less unemployable, and brings us to now: 13 recordings, 250 shows a year or more, 200,000 miles on a well broke in Kia, and a nasty fear of heights. Resonator fueled folk songs from Duluth Minnesota.


EVAN BARTELS AND THE STONEY LONESOMES - Evan Bartels is a lot of things, but above all else he is a storyteller. He has dedicated his life to living in a way that encompasses all facets of the human experience and capturing those feelings and emotions through songwriting. Those that experience Bartels and his band, The Stoney Lonesomes, can hear the authentic emotion drip through warm soulful vocals heightened by a polished Americana sound.

Hailing from the small town of Tobias in Southeast Nebraska, Bartels grew up as the second youngest of four kids. Fostered through the family piano and his father’s Ovation guitar, interest in music was imprinted on him at an early age. The discovery of Ryan Adams’ Heartbreaker album marked a turning point, influencing a change of course for his future writings. Several years and a few guitars later, Bartels, now 25, paints vivid pictures of emotional strife, spiritual conflict, and personal redemption.  In his 2017 debut full-length album, ‘The Devil, God & Me’, Bartels confronts his pains and addresses his search for forgiveness.

Bartels spent the better part of 2017 traveling the country to promote the release of his then upcoming album. During that time, he garnered the attention of national outlets such as No Depression and performed live on NPR Music’s Night Owl sessions in New York City. Further acknowledgment occurred when, ‘The Devil, God & Me’ debuted at #5 on the Billboard Heatseekers West North Central charts its first week and has most recently had music featured on Theo Von’s podcast, This Past Weekend. Building from the previous year’s momentum, 2018 has marked a year of growth for Bartels and his band of brothers. Performances at Tumbleweed Music Festival, Levitt Amp Music Series, ZOOFEST, and other festivals are just a few of the band’s notable appearances. With a new album on the horizon for 2019, Bartels and his band of brothers show no signs of slowing down.


CHICAGO FARMER - The son of a small town farming community, Cody Diekhoff logged plenty of highway and stage time under the name Chicago Farmer before settling in the city in 2003. Profoundly inspired by fellow midwesterner John Prine, he’s a working-class folk musician to his core. His small town roots, tilled with city streets mentality, are turning heads North and South of I-80.

“I love the energy, music, and creativity of Chicago, but at the same time, the roots and hard work of my small town,” he shares. Growing up in Delavan, Illinois, with a population less than 2,000, Diekhoff’s grandparents were farmers, and their values have always provided the baseline of his songs.  He writes music for “the kind of people that come to my shows. Whether in Chicago or Delavan, everyone has a story, and everyone puts in a long day and works hard the same way,” he says. “My generation may have been labeled as slackers, but I don’t know anyone who doesn’t work hard - many people I know put in 50-60 hours a week and 12 hour days. That’s what keeps me playing. I don’t like anyone to be left out; my music is for everyone in big and very small towns.”

He listened to punk rock and grunge as a kid before discovering a friend’s dad playing Hank Williams, and it was a revelation. Prine and Guthrie quickly followed. The name Chicago Farmer was originally for a band, but the utilitarian life of driving alone from bar to bar, city to city–to make a direct connection to his audience and listener, took a deeper hold.

THE CRANE WIVES - In Japanese folklore, the crane wife is a bird disguised as a woman who spins fine silks from her own feathers, until her identity is discovered. The Crane Wives spin fine songs from whole cloth, and you will never want the melodies to leave your head.

From murky origins in Chinese restaurants, high school ska bands, and dorm room jam sessions, the band came together in 2010 in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and immediately began gathering a following with intricate melodies, sister-harmonies, and compelling songcraft. Initially part of the indie folk boom, their sound has grown and broadened with each new recording till categorization becomes difficult: rock, pop, folk? Just call it really good music. Audiences and critics agree: seven "Jammie" awards from influential radio station WYCE in ’11, ’12, ’16 and ’17; winner of Best Folk/Country song from international competition ArtPrize for "Easier" in ’12; and selection as one of ten "Entries We Loved" from the renowned NPR Tiny Desk Contest for "High Horse” in ’17. 

Kate Pillsbury: guitars, vocals, a twinkle in her eye that tells you she sees through your BS but chooses to be amused by it. Emilee Petersmark: guitars, banjo, vocals, boots that will stamp out injustice wherever it may lurk. Ben Zito: bass, occasional howls, secret production weapon. Dan Rickabus: drums, harmony vocals, engineering, relentless and frankly exhausting levels of positivity. Four albums released to date: Safe Ship, Harbored (2011), The Fool In Her Wedding Gown (2012), Coyote Stories (2015), and Foxlore (2016), plus a series of new singles in 2017, all available on iTunes, Spotify, Amazon, Google Play, Bandcamp, CDBaby, and hell, even Myspace.

If you want to hear about love, life, fear, hope, pain, and the occasional natural disaster, this band, and these songs, are for you.

RAY BONNEVILLE - Acclaimed raconteur Ray Bonneville strips his bluesy Americana to its essentials and steeps it in the humid grooves of the South, creating a compelling poetry of hard living and deep feeling. His ninth release, At King Electric, delivers more than his trademark grit and groove. Rich guitar and harmonica lines resonate over spare but spunky rhythms, while Bonneville’s deep, evocative voice confesses life’s harsh realities. Whether performing solo or fronting a band, playing electric or acoustic guitar, Bonneville allows space between notes that adds potency to every chord, lick, and lyric. Often called a “song and groove man,” he began writing his own music after two decades working as a studio musician, playing rowdy rooms with blues bands, and living hard. He’s since released nine albums, won Canada’s Juno award and other prestigious honors, earned wide critical acclaim, and garnered an enthusiastic following in the U.S., Canada, and Europe.